Question 9:

The text boxes in the left panel have been placed in a random order. Restore the original order by dragging the text boxes from the left panel to the right panel.

Given Order

1Art historians believe the small work was part of an altarpiece completed in 1280, which would have hung somewhere in Europe.
2A 10-inch-high painting, called The Mocking of Christ, pained by Cimabue, shows a bedraggled Jesus surrounded by a horde of pushy men and was painted on a panel of poplar wood.
3To verify the newfound painting’s authenticity, researchers compared the distinct wormhole patterns on its back with those from the Flagellation and Madonna panels.
4Only two other panels from the series – the Flagellation of Christ, which hangs in The Frick Collection in New York, and the Madonna and Child Enthroned Between Two Angels, in The National Gallery in London – have been discovered, and there may be five more yet to find.

Correct Order

2A 10-inch-high painting, called The Mocking of Christ, pained by Cimabue, shows a bedraggled Jesus surrounded by a horde of pushy men and was painted on a panel of poplar wood.
1Art historians believe the small work was part of an altarpiece completed in 1280, which would have hung somewhere in Europe.
4Only two other panels from the series – the Flagellation of Christ, which hangs in The Frick Collection in New York, and the Madonna and Child Enthroned Between Two Angels, in The National Gallery in London – have been discovered, and there may be five more yet to find.
3To verify the newfound painting’s authenticity, researchers compared the distinct wormhole patterns on its back with those from the Flagellation and Madonna panels.

Question 10:

The text boxes in the left panel have been placed in a random order. Restore the original order by dragging the text boxes from the left panel to the right panel.

Given Order

1While most cetaceans’ pectoral fins are only one-seventh of their body length, a humpback’s flippers can reach up to one-third of its body length.
2However, a recent study has offered the first concrete evidence of humpbacks using their pectorals for another purpose: herding fish into their mouths.
3Humpbacks are not the largest whale species–that distinction goes to blue whales–but they do boast the longest pectoral fins of any cetacean.
4These massive fins help the whales navigate shallow waters, accelerate rapidly and increase their maneuverability.

Correct Order

3Humpbacks are not the largest whale species–that distinction goes to blue whales–but they do boast the longest pectoral fins of any cetacean.
1While most cetaceans’ pectoral fins are only one-seventh of their body length, a humpback’s flippers can reach up to one-third of its body length.
4These massive fins help the whales navigate shallow waters, accelerate rapidly and increase their maneuverability.
2However, a recent study has offered the first concrete evidence of humpbacks using their pectorals for another purpose: herding fish into their mouths.

Question 11:

The text boxes in the left panel have been placed in a random order. Restore the original order by dragging the text boxes from the left panel to the right panel.

Given Order

1For the trillions of phytoplankton in Earth’s oceans, iron is a limiting nutrient, meaning the available amount of it is a natural check on these creatures’ population size.
2To prove this, scientists in the early 1990s dumped iron across a 64 square kilometer region of the open ocean and quickly observed a doubling in the amount of phytoplankton biomass.
3Humans need it to make new blood cells, while many plants need it to perform photosynthesis.
4However, iron is relatively rare in the open ocean, since it mainly comes in the form of soil particles blown from the land.
5Iron is a vital nutrient for nearly all living things.

Correct Order

5Iron is a vital nutrient for nearly all living things.
3Humans need it to make new blood cells, while many plants need it to perform photosynthesis.
4However, iron is relatively rare in the open ocean, since it mainly comes in the form of soil particles blown from the land.
1For the trillions of phytoplankton in Earth’s oceans, iron is a limiting nutrient, meaning the available amount of it is a natural check on these creatures’ population size.
2To prove this, scientists in the early 1990s dumped iron across a 64 square kilometer region of the open ocean and quickly observed a doubling in the amount of phytoplankton biomass.
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